Rule of Law

Sample Rule of Law Framework: If your circuit uses a value: you can insert whatever value is most applicable to the topic or you prefer to run. Justice or governmental legitimacy work best with this criterion. Barnett 98 [Randy E. Barnett, Patrick Hotung Professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown University, “The Structure of Liberty: Justice and the Rule of Law”, 1998, … Read More

Republicanism

The value for today’s round is justice. Philip Pettit of Princeton University 2003 writes Think of how you feel when your welfare depends on the decision of others and you have no come-back against that decision. You are in a position where you will sink or swim, depending on their say-so. And you have no physical or legal recourse, no … Read More

Rawls – 2 Principles of Justice

The value for today’s round is justice defined as fairness. John Rawls writes in “A theory of Justice” 1971[1] In justice as fairness the original position of equality corresponds to the state of nature in the traditional theory of the social contract. This original position is not, of course, thought of as an actual historical state of affairs, much less … Read More

Political Realism

The value is governmental legitimacy. Political Realist Bernard Williams explains “It is a necessary condition of legitimacy (LEG) that the state solve the first [political] question.” He furthers, “I identify the “first” political question in Hobbesian terms as the securing of order, protection, safety, trust, and the conditions of cooperation. It is “first” because solving it is the condition of … Read More

Paternalism (Liberty/Autonomy)

In order for there to be good ends, there must be some unconditionally good thing. Humanity, or rather our rational nature, is this unconditional good. Christine Korsgaard in 1983 explains that The argument shows how Kant’s idea of justification works. It can be read as a kind of regress upon the conditions, starting from an important assumption. The assumption is … Read More

Respecting Liberty (Korsgaard)

The existence of extrinsic goodness requires unconditional human worth—that means we must treat others as ends in themselves. Christine Korsgaard writes in 1983 that The argument shows how Kant’s idea of justification works. It can be read as a kind of regress upon the conditions, starting from an important assumption. The assumption is that when a rational being makes a … Read More

Locke – Social Contract

Because only a legitimate authority generates political obligations, I value governmental legitimacy. Simmons of Cornell University 1999 explains This Lockean account utilizes one standard moral conception of state legitimacy [which is that],‘ and it is this conception of legitimacy” that I will hereafter have in mind when I use that term. A state’s (or government’s) legitimacy is the complex moral … Read More

Cosmopolitanism

Note – This framework is fairly long and may not be exactly the advocacy you’re looking for. That’s okay! It has a ton of great cards and analysis that you can use to justify and explain cosmopolitanism. I value Global Justice. Global justice is a cosmopolitan view of justice that claims that each person has an inalienable equal human worth, … Read More

Consequentialism

Here, we have a few different options for consequential frameworks. A lot of them use the same/similar cards, but may serve different purposes. The first framework we outline is if you’re really trying to justify consequentialism, and are worried you may lose that debate –  Insert whatever value is most applicable to the topic or you prefer to run. Justice, … Read More

Communitarianism

If applicable, insert your value of choice, based on the topic or what you prefer. Justice, morality and governmental legitimacy work well.  Communitarianism is required to protect both democracy, and individual rights. Amitai Etzioni, Professor of Government at George Washington University 1993 explains Neither human existence nor individual liberty can be sustained for long outside the interdependent and overlapping communities … Read More